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Comment on the two readings: Poe’s The Black Cat and The Purloined Letter.

The Black Cat The Black Cat is quite possibly the darkest and most cautionary short story from Edgar Allan Poe. The way he portrayed alcoholism to be a “fiend” that could allow a man to lose control of his sensibilities and commit the most horrifying of crime, from injuring then...

Describe your experience of reading Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher” or “The Cask of Amontillado.” To what extent did the short story you chose to write about hold your interest? Why?

I have chosen to describe my experience while reading Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado.” The reason I chose to read this short story is that I have an interest in murder stories, especially those of unresolved or unrepentant perpetrators. This story, in particular, held my interest because of...

How does Carter’s Prologue to “Dance and Dancers in the Victorian and Edwardian Music Hall Ballet” illustrate the kinds of questions on ‘naming’, owning and legitimizing dance?

What Carter is doing in the Prologue of her book is trying to restore the atmosphere of the dancing culture of the bygone centuries. However hard humankind could try to push the past behind and dive into the future full of new experience, the past still stands aside, looking closely...

Read Carter’s Prologue to her study of ballet in the London Music Hall during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Identify the main theoretical strands and critical strategies employed and relate these to the issues of knowledge, power, and identity evident in the summaries of Barker’s Chapter 6 ‘Enter Postmodernism’ of “Cultural Studies.”

In the Prologue to her book Dance and Dancers in the Victorian and Edwardian Music Hall Ballet, Alexandra Carter exercises the idea of the dance that has rushed through the epochs, leaving unique dancing styles and helping people to create the theory of dance, while the dancers put it to...

a. What is the plot and setting of the story? b. Who did the garden behind the house belonged to? c. What did the Witch learn by the end of the play? d. What did Rapunzel learn? e. Was there a villain in this story? Who was it? Did the villain win out? f. What surprised you the most in the play? g. The Prince went through a couple of severe changes. What were these changes? h. What is the moral of the story?

a. The plot of the story is about an unborn child named Rapunzel and is supposed to be given to a witch as payment after her parents are caught stealing. The setting is deep in the forest, where the child is locked in a tower after turning 12. b. The...

What is the plot and setting of the Rapunzel story?

The story is set in a forest. A couple that has longed for a baby lives in a house next to the Witch’s garden. Once, the husband trespasses on the enchantress’ garden to take some rampion for his wife (The Grimm Brothers, n.d.). The Witch tells him he can have...

Who would you propose is the protagonist of “A Raisin in the Sun” play by Lorraine Hansberry, and who are the antagonists? Justify your opinion by including specific parts of the story and plot.

Walter is the play’s protagonist as he is a personification of African Americans’ hopes and struggles in the 1960s. He believes that his race is the major factor affecting his financial hardships and tries any possible way to gain a certain status. Walter is not interested in the fight for...

Take two quotes from the article “Emergency” by D. Johnson and analyze them.

“A general greyness was giving birth to various shapes, it was true.” This quote resembles the surreal feelings the author felt under the influence of psychotropic pills. The metaphor “greyness was giving birth” implies the lively perception of the surroundings by applying anthropological features to them. The way of constructing...

The romantics enjoyed sublime experiences. The sublime is an experience that combines joy and fear like being on a roller-coaster. Meeting John Keats’ “La Belle Dame Sans Merci” is a sublime experience. Explain.

Sublime experience is always controversial: a person comes into contact with something equally beautiful and scary. The woman in “La Belle Dame Sans Merci” is so beautiful that it is intimidating. Besides, it is not clear where she comes from – after all, not a lot of women live alone...

In John Keats’ poem “La Belle Dame Sans Merci,” the knight is on the cold side of the hill, and the girl lives in an elfin’s grotto. Explain how the setting in this poem reflects the frame of mind of the main characters.

The setting of the poem showcases the juxtaposition of the two main characters. The cold hill and the bleak landscape around reflect the demeanor of the knight. He is pursuing his path alone with no one to accompany him. He may not even be knowing where he is going –...

In the “Introduction”, critic George Schade calls Juan Rulfo “the best writer of fiction in Latin America today, and a writer to be reckoned with on a universal scale.” He goes on to say “The Indians [natives] who live and die on the burning Plain in Jalisco are usually treated by Rulfo as individuals with interior lives full of anguish as well as exterior lives of struggle against hardship and abuse.” Can you apply this claim to the stories “Paso del Norte” and “Anacleto Morones”? What evidence do you see of their “interior anguish” or their “exterior hardships and abuses”?

I think that the suggestion of George Schade does apply to many characters in the short stories of Juan Rulfo. For example, it is rather self-evident that the character of the Son in the Paso Del Norte struggles hard with the anguish of knowing that his children are often forced...

“Anacleto Morones” story presents two sides of an argument between nuns and the narrator, Lucas Lucatero. They argue about what kind of a man Anacleto Morones was for them. You be the judge and jury in the debate and decide which view of Morones must be the correct one.

Despite the fact that, as it appears from Lucatero’s account of him, Anacleto Morones was nothing but a common crook, there can be only a few doubts that he can generally be described as a rather positive character. The reason for this is that, unlike what happened to be the...

The essay discussing Wounded Knee was written from the point of view of whom?

The essay focusing on Wounded Knew asserts that in the year 1887, the Dawes Act was passed into law to end tribalism among the Native Americans. After the passage of the act, Native Americans’ lands were subdivided into small parcels and distributed among Indian families. The reminders of the lands...

Why is the studying of Hispanic American literature important?

Exploring Hispanic American literature is a fascinating experience that is both exciting and essential. One might believe that the connection between the current Hispanic American community and Hispanic American literature relics is rather frail, yet it is quite far from the truth. On the contrary, the exploration of Hispanic American...

Why is the studying of Hispanic American literature important?

Literature, in general, can be seen as a collection of ideas, theories, and stories that have stood the test of time and, thus, can be used to promote important values and encourage people to think creatively and analytically. However, literature associated with a certain culture can also be seen as...

To what extent do Hughes’s poems pose problems of interpretation? Do you think that there is very little actual interpretive work or analysis for you to do on his poems? Why or why not?

While Hughes’ poems may have been unorthodox in form, they carried many themes and messages relevant to his time which could be interpreted in many ways. Hughes chose to often use the improvisational techniques of the traditional African American culture rather than classical forms. However, many of his poems were...

Which is your favorite poem by Hughes? Why?

My personal favorite poem by Hughes is “Mother to Son,” inspirational and touching verses as coming from a loving mother to her son just stepping into the world. The message of this poem is very gritty and down-to-earth, creating a sense of hope when faced with adversity. However, Hughes creates...

Explain the contrast that Hughes sets up in the poem “I, Too.”

Looking at the poem superficially, the first struggle seems to be between the lives of a white man and a black man, racial tension indeed being part of this poem’s theme. However, Hughes may have been attempting to set up the contrast between the difficult life of African Americans of...

According to the Chinese Literature Today article, Lu Xun’s “Diary of a Madman’ is considered the “first modern Chinese vernacular story,” and the short story has been celebrated as vital “in the turbulent and transformative period of the early twentieth century.” Using “Diary of a Mad Man” and “The Man of La Mancha” as examples, discuss why the short story is an especially important genre for modern Chinese literature.

“Diary of a Madman” is often considered the most influential short story of Chinese vernacular. It provided a passionate critique of the traditional way of life in an accessible form and through creative metaphors. The short story format is perhaps the best way of communicating such ideas because it allows...

Discuss two texts that portray America’s Jim Crow system of racial segregation. Using Benedict Anderson’s term “community,” write an essay discussing what the differences between these portrayals reveal about the nation as an “imagined political community.”

In the literary piece called “Of the Two Johns,” the author presents Jim Craw’s system of regulation through schools; Since African-American John strives to open a school to educate his community members, one may assume that he wants to make their lives better; He faces rejection and racial segregation in...

Discuss two literary modernist texts that respond differently to modernization in America. Using Benedict Anderson’s term “community,” write an essay discussing what these differences reveal about the nation as an “imagined political community.”

The story “Of the Two Johns” depicts the role of education in one’s perception of the community; When African-American John becomes educated, he starts to understand that racial and ethnic differences do not matter, while his relatives cannot comprehend it; White John becomes disregardful for racial discrimination and sexually assaults...

In what ways does the metamorphosis mean change?

Gregor Samsa wakes up one morning but not as his usual self but as vermin. His voice changes, his look is scary. He can no longer eat his favorite meal, i.e., milk and bread, so he resorts to taking rotten bread cramps. Instead of going to work every day, his...

Provide the academic and etymological definitions of “Geography”. Discuss and exemplify what is referred to as “Geographic Value Judgments”.

The academic meaning of geography is that it is the study that deals with the description, distribution, and interaction of miscellaneous physical, biological and cultural features of the Earth’s surface. It explains the study of natural phenomena and the distribution of natural resources on the Earth’s crust. Geography deals with...

How is Bridget Jones’s Diary connected to Pride and Prejudice?

Bridget Jones’s Diary is thought to be a modern version of Pride and Prejudice. Set in a different era, a 1996 novel about Bridget Jones develops similar topics as the original in some ways. More Information Bridget Jones’s Diary, a 1996 novel by Helen Fielding, is a modern adaptation of...

What is Pride and Prejudice vocabulary like?

Pride and Prejudice’s vocabulary is rather difficult to read for modern people. One of the reasons might be the change of a writing style over time. In addition, in the novel, free indirect discourse is used to provide insight into the characters’ inner world. More Information Pride and Prejudice was...

What is the most famous monologue in Pride and Prejudice?

Mr. Darcy’s first marriage proposal to Elizabeth is the most famous monologue in Pride and Prejudice. Although she meets it with rejection, this confession of love plays a pivotal role in the novel’s plot. It also reveals Darcy’s romantic and prideful character. It is one of the factors that give...

What is the role of the rain scene in Pride & Prejudice (2005)?

The scene with the conversation between Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy in the rain communicates the main idea of the piece adapted in the film. Elizabeth Bennet refuses to accept Mr. Darcy’s proposal. She demonstrates that she, as a strong person, wants to engage in marriage only on the terms...

What Role Do Card Games Play in Pride and Prejudice?

The card games are generally the nobility’s pastime in Pride and Prejudice. They include loo, twenty-one, whist, and commerce, most of which are round games. They represent the divide between the upper class and the gentry, to which the main character belongs. More Information Pride and Prejudice is set in...

Who is the Hero of Pride & Prejudice?

Elizabeth Bennet and Fitzwilliam Darcy are two central characters in Pride and Prejudice. The main plotline is tied around them. They also participate in all the critical events of the story. Despite her flaws, they are loved by millions of people. More Information Jane Austen wrote Pride and Prejudice. It...

What Is the Main Conflict in The Yellow Wallpaper?

Despite several debates in a short story called The Yellow Wallpaper, the central conflict is the opposition between society and a woman. This struggle of two concepts reflects modern problems as well. More Information Several conflicts are going on in The Yellow Wallpaper. However, the primary one concerns the struggle...

What is Pride & Prejudice: A Latter-Day Comedy About?

Pride & Prejudice: A Latter-Day Comedy is an American romantic comedy. It is based on Jane Austen’s novel Pride and Prejudice. It shows the same characters and romantic lines but is set in a modern-day college town in Utah. More Information Pride & Prejudice: A Latter-Day Comedy is a 2003...

What Are the Books Similar to Pride and Prejudice?

Pride and Prejudice is one of Jane Austen’s most popular novels. It became classic English literature, attracting more readers every year. However, Jane Eyre and Little Women are books written in the same literary period. They fit a similar genre and tackle similar themes. More Information Many readers struggle with...

What Could the Modern Version of Pride and Prejudice Be?

The best Pride and Prejudice modern version is Bridget Jones Diary by Helen Fielding. Bridget’s and Mark Darcy’s romantic story reminds of Elizabeth’s and Mr. Darcy’s love line. More Information The plot of both writings coincides in several moments. Both Austen’s Elizabeth and Fielding’s Bridget try to look for a...

What Is First Impressions by Jane Austen about?

First Impressions is the first completed novel by a famous English writer. It appears to be an early version of Pride and Prejudice. A classic piece of English literature reveals the relations between Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy. More Information Before getting into the final shape, Pride and Prejudice had...

Which Class of English Society is Portrayed in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice?

The Bennets are the family of the main female character. They are landowners who accumulate money from their property. Belonging to the landed gentry class, they are below the nobility, though. The class gap is the milestone of the central conflict of Pride and Prejudice. More Information ‘Pride and Prejudice’...

How Does Austen Describe Derbyshire in Pride & Prejudice?

Elizabeth travels to Derbyshire with the Gardiners – her uncle and her aunt. Her first impression of the place is incredibly pleasant. Austen describes it in Chapter 43: “As they drove along, watched for the first appearance of Pemberley Woods with some perturbation; and when at length they turned in...

What Does the Quote “I Am so Modest I Can Admit My Own Fault” Mean?

The quote “I am so modest I can admit my own fault” relates to the turning point in chapter 58 of Pride and Prejudice. Darcy gets humbled by Elizabeth’s rejection. He admits that his letter of the proposal was a mistake. He should have considered her feelings seriously. Instead, the...

Describe the First Proposal Scene in Pride & Prejudice.

Mr. Darcy makes the first proposal to Elizabeth when she visits her friend Charlotte and Mr. Collins. Elizabeth rejects the proposition since she found out that Mr. Darcy had ruined Jane Bennet and Mr. Bingley’s marriage. More Information Elizabeth Bennet is the second of five daughters of Mr. and Mrs....

Where Does Lydia Live in Pride and Prejudice?

Lydia Bennet is a younger sister of Elizabeth Bennet. She appears in multiple locations throughout the novel. At first, the girl lives in Bennet’s house with the rest of the family. Later she escapes with the Colonel and his wife to Brighton. There she meets Wickham to marry him and...

Why Is Pride and Prejudice a Classic Novel?

Pride and Prejudice tells a traditional love story. The writing raises acute social and personal issues. These are pride, vanity, and lame morality. Such a pattern is pretty inherent to such books. More Information The characters in the novel are alluring. It adds to the romantic novel’s being classic. One...

What Are the Most Famous Film Versions of Pride & Prejudice?

Jane Austen wrote the novel in the far 1812. The famous story inspired filmmakers to create their own screen adaptations. There are many film versions, with the most famous ones of 2005, 1995 and 1980 years. More Information The 1980-year version presents Jane Austin’s novel in a mini-series. A common...

Where Did Darcy Propose to Elizabeth for the First Time?

Mr. Darcy first attempts to propose to Elizabeth in Hunsford Parsonage. He met her there while she was visiting the newly-wed Collins family. Darcy caught Elisabeth entirely by surprise. Thus, the girl rejects this proposal for many reasons. More Information Elizabeth leaves for Kent to visit Charlotte and her husband,...

What Was Gilman’s Reason for Sending Her Story to Her Former Physician?

Charlotte Perkins Gilman sent a copy of her story to her former doctor. She wanted to show him how wrong the treatment of depression was. After the birth of her child, the author, similar to her character, suffered from severe postpartum depression. Gilman recovered only because she stopped following the...

What Is the Theme of The Yellow Wallpaper?

Charlotte Perkins Gilman discussed the theme of the position of women in society. It was especially relevant in the past. Females had few rights and freedom compared with males having complete control over them. Sadly, the theme is still significant in the 21st century. Women constantly face both direct and...

Who Is the Narrator of The Yellow Wallpaper?

The narrator of the story is a nameless woman. She personifies female weakness and submission in a patriarchal society. In this short story, a woman was diagnosed with a mental disease and treated at home by her husband. She has been locked in a room for three months. More Information...

Who is Jane in the Yellow Wallpaper?

The most common theory is that Jane is the name of the unnamed protagonist. She is also the narrator in Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper. Gilman uses an unreliable narrator to signify her character’s rapid mental health decline. Her rejection of herself and the social norms are shown through...

What Is the Importance of Irony in The Yellow Wallpaper?

Irony plays a crucial role in the story by Charlotte Perkins Gillman. It emphasizes how the course of treatment chosen by the narrator’s husband only worsens her condition. It also increases the reader’s engagement and facilitates sympathy for the main character. More Information The narrator is the main character of...

What Time Period is The Yellow Wallpaper Set in?

Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper is set in the time period of the late 1890s and early 1900s. The main reason is that the story is based on Gilman’s own life. It can be a semi-memoir as well. More Information The time period setting of The Yellow Wallpaper is...

What Is the Narrator’s Name in The Yellow Wallpaper?

There is no definite answer to the name of the narrator in The Yellow Wallpaper. She is not referred to directly by her name throughout the short story. Some readers speculate that her name might be Jane due to one phrase she says at the end. More Information In The...

Why Did John Faint in The Yellow Wallpaper?

The reason for John to faint at the end of the novel is his shock provoked by the wife’s mental state. He is a doctor and tries to treat his wife. The character prescribes the “rest therapy” to eliminate any distressing events from escalating the protagonist’s depression. This approach only...

What Does Creeping Mean in The Yellow Wallpaper?

The process of “creeping” in the short story by Charlotte Perkins Gilman symbolizes the struggle of the women. She wants to overcome discrimination and domestic captivity. The word is repetitive in the narration. It adds to the story’s creepy air that unfolds around the woman. She became a victim of...

What Event Caused the Narrator’s Mental Illness in The Yellow Wallpaper?

The Yellow Wallpaper is written from the perspective of a physician’s wife forced to a rest cure. She suffers from a “temporary nervous depression” after the birth of her child. In modern terms, it seems that she suffers from postpartum depression caused by a stressful pregnancy. More Information The narrator...

Who Is the Woman in The Yellow Wallpaper?

The woman behind the wallpaper in Gilman’s short story represents the identity of the narrator. For the story, she falls into madness and seeks an escape. That’s why she identifies with the woman who she thinks is kept behind the yellow wallpaper. More Information The Yellow Wallpaper is a short...

Why Is the Conclusion Significant?

The creepy culmination of The Yellow Wallpaper has various polarized interpretations. The ending is significant since the unnamed narrator finally breaks free from the chains of society. However, it soon becomes clear that she is not liberated at all. She still has to live with the prejudice patriarchy puts on...

How Does The Yellow Wallpaper End?

At the end of the story, the narrator is seduced by an act of insanity. She starts crawling around the room in circles and touching the wallpaper. When John, her husband, faints, the narrator proceeds with circling the room. The woman steps over his inert body every time she passes....

Why Does the Narrator First Dislike the Yellow Wallpaper?

The narrator finds the yellow color of the wallpaper disturbing and revolting. She doesn’t like the erratic patterns and the fact that the wallpaper is peeling off. She claims it’s the worst paper she has seen in her life. More Information The narrator’s first impression of the wallpaper is quite...

What Are the Examples of Foreshadowing in The Yellow Wallpaper?

The novel is told through a diary of a woman who is driven into insanity by several factors. The first factor was the lack of human contact. The second factor was the inability to distract herself from bad emotions and the lack of support. The beginning of the story contains...

What Are the Best Examples of Figurative Language in The Yellow Wallpaper?

Gilman uses such figurative language as imagery, similes, and personification. She does it to portray a woman who is out of touch with reality. The author aims to link her readers with the character. More Information Imagery is sensory language. It is used to describe physical qualities of objects and...

What Happens at the End of The Yellow Wallpaper?

The ending of Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper is tragic and symbolic. A woman suffers from nervous depression. The narrator is locked in a room with good intentions but loses her mind in the end. She tears the wallpapers off in an attempt to free another imaginary woman. She believes the...

The Yellow Wallpaper: Author’s Intention

Charlotte Perkins wrote The Yellow Wallpaper in 1892. Women did not have the basic right to be responsible for their lives and well-being at the time. Men were the ones to decide what a woman should do or say. The author wrote her story to claim women to be independent...

Why did Lydia run off with Wickham?

Lydia fell in love with charming George Wickham right away. She decided to run off with him because she was immature and naïve. Lydia wasn’t at all aware of Wickham’s shady past. She did not see the true motives of his marriage proposal. More Information Lydia Bennet is the youngest...

When Does Darcy Propose to Elizabeth for the Second Time?

Darcy proposes to Elizabeth the second time in Chapter 58. It happens during their reflective walk. Since the first attempt, his feelings have remained the same. He hurries to reveal it to Elizabeth. The point is that her own feelings have changed towards him. Now she is ready to accept...

How does Jane Austen Describe Hertfordshire in Pride and Prejudice?

Hertfordshire is a cozy English county. This place is the primary setting of Pride and Prejudice. It includes Longbourn village, Netherfield Park, the town of Meryton, and the Bennet estate. Jane Austen describes Meryton as “a small market town.” Longbourn village is a place where Bennets have their estate. Setting...

What did Darcy’s proposal in Pride & Prejudice look like?

“Pride and Prejudice” reveals the connection between Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy. He first proposes to Elizabeth when she is in the Hunsford Parsonage. The girl rejects Darcy because he seems too arrogant to her. Besides, he insults her family. This refusal facilitates Darcy’s character development. His second proposal is more...

How does Austen describe the double wedding in Pride and Prejudice?

The novel’s final scene is the double wedding of Bennett’s sisters. Elizabeth marries Mr. Darcy, and Jane marries Mr. Bingley. Austen shows the complexity of marriage as a social phenomenon. To her, marriage is a controversial thing. Her reflections upon affairs between two people come to the logical end. More...

Who Was the Owner of the Estate Called Hunsford?

Hunsford Estate is a fictional place in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. The clergymen William Collins and his wife, Charlotte, occupied it. The owner of the estate is Lady Catherine De Bourgh, Mr. Collins’ patroness. More information Hunsford Estate is an imaginary place from Jane Austen’s novel Pride and Prejudice....

How and when did Elizabeth learn the truth about Wickham?

Darcy’s letter reveals the bitter truth about Wickham to Elizabeth. The girl couldn’t believe it at first. It was hard for her to admit that he deceived her. Elizabeth begins to recognize the liar’s depravity. More information The novel “Pride and Prejudice” tells a beautiful story. It shows how the...