Stuck with your history assignment?

Get answers from academic experts to any study-related questions.

Though language itself does not “fossilize”, the archaeological and fossil record provides some evidence of the linguistic capabilities of our ancestors. Using the evidence available, what sort of linguistic abilities do you think early Homo possessed?

Different peculiarities of fossils found in different periods of time can give researchers different evidence of the level of brain development and activity connected with it. Language is a result of brain activity and work of vocal apparatus, that is why it is possible to judge its development based on...

Describe the anatomy of bipedalism, providing examples from head to toe of how bipedalism can be “diagnosed” from a single bone. Do you think evidence from a single bone is enough to determine whether an organism from the past was bipedal?

Bipedalism is a very important peculiarity of a human being, which helped it to obtain its modern image. It is such a form of motion when an organism moves with the help of two legs. It is a very significant change for an organism. Each part of its structure is...

Why is dating so important for paleoanthropologists and archeologists? Would an interpretation of physical or cultural remains change depending upon the date assigned to the remains? Why are metaphors used in the context of geologic time?

The Discovery of some fossils or remnants is not the end of the process of their study. One of the main issues of this process is the determination of their age, as it is a very important thing to do. There are a great number of different methods to determine...

Considering some of the trends seen among the primates, such as increased brain size or fewer teeth, why is it incorrect to say that some primates are more evolved than others? What is wrong with the statement that humans are more evolved than chimpanzees?

According to the presence of some common features human beings and monkeys belong to one big class of primates. They are characterized by different common peculiarities. Some of them have more developed teeth and hands, while other representatives have a bigger brain. However, it is impossible to say that some...

What are the main differences between mammals and reptiles? Do we share any ancestral features with reptiles? What are some of the derived features characteristic of mammals including humans?

According to the classification of living things human beings belong to mammals. However, there is a great number of other different categories. The category of reptiles is one of them. The main difference lies in the way different processes proceed. First of all, it is a question of thermoregulation. Mammals...

The four evolutionary forces-mutation, genetic drift, gene flow and natural selection- all affect biological variation. Some are at work in individuals while others function at the population level. Compare and contrast these evolutionary forces, outlining their contributions to biological variations.

There are four main sources of evolution. They are genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and natural selection. Each of them has its force to influence people`s development. Natural selection is one of the first known forces. It is trying to explain some peculiarities of species, underlining their struggle for existence,...

How does the study of African American vernacular English illustrate the anthropological approach to this issue? Explain the basic view of language that anthropologists are working with their approach to a topic like this.

African American vernacular English is believed to be the language of African Americans. It should be stated that middle-class White Americans do not use this language as if they consider it from the perspective of the Standard English it is believed to be the African American vernacular English is grammatically...

What does anthropology analyze in the issue of language?

Studying languages, the anthropologist prefers to consider the nature of the language, the origin of the words and the thematic of the language in general. Many scholars are sure that each language makes the nations that use it to see the environment from different perspectives. Thus, the perception of reality...

Describe the Yanomami people.

These people are located in Brazil and across Venezuela. The Yanomami practice the animism religion. They believe animals and plants have spirits inside them. They are led mainly by a shaman who is actually a healer according to them. The Yanomami are basically farmers. The men prepare the planting fields,...

Provide the ethnographic description of the Basseri tribe.

The Basseri are found in Fars Province of Iran. They migrate to the mountains of Shiraz. The dominant religion is Islam. They are headed by a Chief who wields vast authority over the people. There are also headmen for smaller groups who help the Chief with his duties. The dominant...

Who are the Taiwanese?

The Taiwanese are located in the rural area of North West Hong Kong. They practiced nature reverence initially and later Buddhism. Their dominant mode of production is farming. Among the Taiwanese, the women hardly work as they rely on the men to take care of them. Men are regarded as...

Provide the ethnographic sketch of the Maya.

The Mayans are located in South America in Guatemala and Mexico. The dominant religion among them is Christianity. The earlier Mayans believed in a recurring nature of instances. Smaller portions of present Maya are found in Belize and Western parts of Honduras and El Salvador. The earlier Maya had a...

Who are the Kwaios? Provide an ethnographic sketch of the tribe.

The Kwaio is located in Central Malaita, Solomon Islands. They do not have a dominant religion and engage in worshipping their ancestors. They are under chiefdoms. Their dominant mode of production is subsistence farming. The women are mainly charged with the duties of feeding the children and other domestic chores....

Describe the Nuer people

The Nuer people are found in Sudan and parts of Ethiopia. They have no dominant religion but practice traditional rituals. They are set up in tribes and have no overall authority. They are primarily pastoralists and also do very small scale farming. Women tend to the crops as the men...

Provide the ethnographic description of the Roma.

The Roma are also referred to as the Gypsies but which is considered a derogatory term, is a Diasporas population living away from their ancestral land. They are originally from North India and are spread throughout all of Europe, North America and Central Asia. The Roma do not conform to...

Who are the Tiwi?

The Tiwi live on two islands that are off the northern coastal strip of Australia. The main religion is Christianity. The elderly are accorded a lofty level of deference. These people hunt and fish traditional foods. Among the Tiwi, the division of labor was such that the women provided most...

Provide an ethnographic sketch for the Ju/Hoansi.

These are a subgroup of the San peoples of Southern Africa who reside in the area crossing the borders of three countries. These are Namibia, Botswana and Angola. Their beliefs are more embedded in the spiritual world. They have beliefs in a lesser god and the spirits of the dead....

Who are the Brazilians? Prepare an ethnographic sketch.

This is a group of people who are found in Brazil that is located on the East Central Coast of the South American continent. Being autonomous people, each unit or village is led by a headman. This headman relies on a group of sons and in-laws for support, since his...

Describe the amputation as the most common treatment during the Civil War

The most common treatment during the Civil War was the amputations of limbs. Amputations were necessitated by the fact that Minnie Ball (which was the most common weapon), left gaping wounds, destroyed muscles, tissues and arteries and splintered bones beyond reasonable repair. Even where resection of the limbs was an...

Why and how did Mary Surratt die?

Mary Jenkins Surratt was a boarding house owner who was convicted and hanged for being part of the conspiracy against Abraham Lincoln. Surratt went down in history as the first white woman in the US to be executed by the United States federal government. Surratt was a confederate sympathizer during...

Describe Lincoln as a leader

Lincoln is arguably the most popular president of the United States of America. Other presidents had more power, more skill and more experience in leadership who still do not come close to the influential Lincoln. One of the reasons why Lincoln gained the respect of many citizens and scholars is...

Why was gangrene so common during the Civil War?

Gangrene is a condition that encourages the death of tissue cells. The most affected tissues are usually on the feet and arms. During the Civil War, Gangrene was very common due to poor treatment, thus, infection of battle wounds. Hygiene was not given much concern during the Civil war. Doctors...

What was the difference between Lee and Davis?

Lee and Davis have been described as the best leaders of the Confederate side. The two were, however, very different in terms of strategy and deployment. Whereas Lee was calculating and liked open communication, Davis has been described as dictatorial. Lee would often take time to understand his opponents, the...

Who lost the First Battle of Bull Run and why?

The First Bull Run started with a seemingly positive result for the Union. However, things took a sharp turn when the Confederates pushed harder than the Union expected. The success experienced by Confederates can be attributed to their intelligence gathering system. Communication was top notch during the First Bull Run...

Why were diseases so common during the Civil War?

620,000 soldiers died during the Civil war. However, three-thirds of this number died of disease and not of wounds or battle. There are several reasons as to why diseases took the lives of more soldiers than the war. The first reason is poor hygiene. The soldiers rarely took showers since...

What was the purpose of Lee’s Plan on Gettysburg and why it went wrong?

The book by Tom Carhart about Lee’s plan on Gettysburg argues that Lee wanted to divide the defender’s troops and achieve a divide and conquer win. Carhart relies on the fact that Lee was a very good confederate strategist and he would not have taken his army to the slaughter...

What were the historical context and purpose of the Conscription Laws?

The Conscription Laws were introduced to get more people to volunteer as soldiers. Initially, the volunteers signed up due to loyalty to their families, country and tradition. However, since the war took longer than expected, more young men refused to sign up as soldiers. The South and the North reacted...

What were the reasons for the Union Blockade?

The Union Blockade was meant to prevent the Confederacy from trading. Scholars have debated the benefits and disadvantages that this blockage experienced. The blockade monitored and controlled approximately 3,500 miles of the Atlantic and Gulf coastline, and twelve ports. Despite many ships passing through the blockade, it is arguably correct...

Who were the leaders of command for the modern war in 1864?

Lincoln introduced the modern system of command for the modern war in 1864. He detailed three top positions that would affect how the war and the country was to be led. These positions were the commander in chief, the general in chief and the chief of staff. Being the president,...

What happened in the Duel of Ironclads, 1862?

There was a lot of fanfare during the Duel of Ironclads in 1862. The duel was the first meeting of ironclad warships. The world was eager to see how the ships would fare to make decisions on whether to build similar warships or to stick to the type they already...

What impact did Abraham Lincoln have on US history?

Time and again, Lincoln has been identified as one of the most influential presidents of the USA. His leadership style has been analyzed and several arguments made for and against his style. One of the impressive aspects of his leadership was his sense of discipline. He was thus able to...

What was the role of Henry Hunt during the Civil War?

Henry Jackson Hunt, the Chief of Artillery during the Civil War helped shape the results of the war. He recorded several success measures and, shockingly, his success is rarely recognized. The very first moment of fame for Hunt was during the 1861 Battle of Bull Run. In this battle, Hunt...

A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s. 1. What was life like in the Labor Camp, for the prisoners, for the guards? 2. What were the interactions between the men like? What was at stake? 3. How did people survive these horrible conditions?

1. In his book, Alexander Solzhenitsyn depicts the experiences of prisoners in the labor camp. In particular, their lives were dominated by the back-breaking toil. Additionally, these people were driven by the constant fear of punishment. These individuals understood that they had been deprived of any rights in the camp....

1) What were the goals of the Five Year Plan? Were they met or not? 2) What methods did he use to implement the plan? 3) How did these methods differ from the way industrialization occurred in western Europe?

1) According to Joseph Stalin, the Five-year Plan was to achieve several goals. In particular, it was necessary to transform the Soviet Union into an industrial country. Furthermore, the industrialization had to strengthen the military capacity of the state. Overall, the government was indeed able to increase the industrial output...

1. Why do you think Chamberlain was praised by most British for his role in appeasing Hitler over the issue of the Sudetenland? 2. What was Chamberlain’s justification for encouraging Czechoslovakia to accept Hitler’s demands in the Munich Agreement? Was his position reasonable? Why or why not? 3. What positive results did Chamberlain see emerging from this crisis?

1. Chamberlain was praised by many British people because they believed that the compromise with Adolf Hitler could reduce the risk of war in Europe. Moreover, this decision was supposed to guarantee lasting peace for the United Kingdom. 2. Chamberlain argued that Czechoslovakia should accept the terms of the Munich...

The 20th century saw the rise of a broad middle-class in American life. Although fitful in the early decades, this ascent quickened after the Second World War. Commentators today, however, suggest that the once expanding middle-class is slowly shrinking. How would you assess the role of the American middle-class throughout the postwar period? When weighing your answer you might consider issues that wrap around RACE and CLASS in 20th Century American Life. You might also consider the intersection between the rising tide of consumption in the century and the persistent impulse to reform. Finally, you might consider the current state of the American middle-class and the possible consequences of fundamental change in that broad class.

The American middle class during the post-war period helped the country to experience high levels of economic growth which was mainly driven by strong consumer demand. The social structure of American society dramatically changed because former military servicemen were offered affordable housing loans which made it easy for them to...

The period from 1968 to the present seems to reflect an insurgent conservatism in American life. What, if anything changed? Was movement Simply ” Old wine in the bottle” or something truly new, perhaps revolutionary? What were the elements that contributed to this conservative movement? What does it mean?

The conservatism movement in the U.S. was influenced by various political and economic factors. Since the late 1960s, many Republican party supporters have supported conservative government policies which favor a reduction in government regulation of economic activities and an increase in military spending. Conservatism grew as a reaction to the...

During World War II, Germany tried to capture the Russian city of Stalingrad because A) it was the site of atrocities committed by Stalin. B) it had a strategic location along the Volga River. C) it had a large and persecuted German population. D) it was where aggression against Germany was centered.

During World War II, Germany tried to capture the Russian city of Stalingrad because it had a strategic location along the Volga River (answer B). Explanation: The Battle of Stalingrad is the most significant and bloody confrontation of World War II, having lasted for five months and ending in a...

Which of the following best describes the state of the US economy at the end of World War II? A) It was starting to come out of the Great Depression. B) It was deep into the second Great Depression. C) It was experiencing steady growth from wartime production. D) It was entering yet another recession. 2)Which two groups cooperated with the government to switch from peacetime to wartime production? A) state governments and armed forces B) labor and business C) the Allies and the Axis powers D) the president and Congress

C. It was experiencing steady growth from wartime production. Explanation: The United States benefited from World War II considerably. The country was removed from the center of the fighting and only entered the fray after the Pearl Harbor bombing in December 1941. Due to its relative freedom from invasions and...

What first lady banned dancing and card playing in the white house?

Sarah Childress Polk Explanation: Sarah Childress Polk was the wife of James Polk, 11th President of the United States. She was First Lady from 1845 to 1849. She came from a wealthy family and was among the rare women in the 19th century who had the opportunity to receive higher...

Joseph McCarthy gained public attention by

Joseph McCarthy gained public attention by claiming that communists and spies sent by the USSR had infiltrated the US government. Explanation: During the Cold War, there was a rise in propaganda against communism around the USA. The House Un-American Activities Committee, known as the HUAC, existed since 1938. Their principal...

Why were Julius and Ethel Rosenberg considered dangerous during the Cold War? A) Both worked to create the first atomic bombs for the USSR. B) Both were connected to radical groups. C) Julius had worked for the VENONA project. D) Ethel was a Russian immigrant who arrived after WWII.

A (both worked to create the first atomic bombs for the USSR) is correct. Explanation: Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were a couple that was arrested and found blameworthy of espionage for the Soviet Union during the second Red Scare. Their role as spies was to help the USSR acquire enough...

Which best identifies Jackie Robinson’s reason for writing his letter to President Eisenhower? A) He hopes that the president will take immediate action to curb segregation laws at the federal level. B) He believes that the president should punish Governor Faubus for his inexcusable actions. C) He feels that the president has too much sympathy for pro-segregationists like Governor Faubus. D) He thinks that the president should be commended for his remarks at the Summit Meeting of Negro Leaders.

The correct answer is A – he hopes that the president will take immediate action to curb segregation laws at the federal level. Explanation: Jackie Robinson’s letter may be considered more of an immediate call to action, rather than a petition for someone’s punishment, such as answer B. Similarly, answers...

What does Joe Martin say are the four questions we must answer for ourselves?

Explanation: Joe Martin is the founder and the president of RealWorld University, who gave a speech at the NACADA 2005 National Conference in 2005. In his speech, Joe Martin talked about serving others and presented four questions that can help individuals to reflect on the existing situation and find a...

The constitutional issue at the heart of united states v. nixon is best described as A) whether the supreme Court could hear the case B) the right of a president to resist impeachment C) the extent to which the separation of powers was allowed D) wheatherlaws had been broken during the watergate incident

C. The extent to which the separation of powers was allowed. Explanation: The United States v. Nixon (1974) involved the President Richard Nixon who was accused of being involved in the Watergate Scandal (1972). The Watergate Scandal was a break-in to the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee that revealed...

What message did the Roosevelt Corollary send to the rest of the world? A)The United States had the most powerful navy in the world. B)The United States was in charge of the Western Hemisphere. C)The United States was uninterested in world issues. D)The United States had the strongest economy in the world. 2. During World War I, the main goal of the US government agency that created war posters was… A)to increase public support for the war. B)to convince the soldiers in Europe to fight. C)to help get President Wilson reelected. D)to take people’s minds off the war.

Question 1. B. The United States was in charge of the Western Hemisphere. Explanation: Theodore Roosevelt’s Corollary was an addition to the Monroe Doctrine that stated that America was in charge of the Western Hemisphere. The document noted that the United States would intervene as a last resort to ensure...

During the korean war, general macarthur was able to take the city of inchon a) by striking in an area far away from where the fighting had been concentrated. b) tricking north korea into believing he that would use nuclear weapons. c) convincing china to enter the war on the side of south korea. d) launching a surprise attack from deep within north korean territory.

By striking in an area far away from where the fighting had been concentrated. Explanation: The United States Marines took the port of Inchon, South Korea, on September 15, 1950, during the Korean War. Inchon city (see the map below) was located 25 miles from Seoul that had fallen to...

How did the weakening of the soviet union affect other nations in Europe

It strengthened those with democratic governments. Explanation: Till January 1991, the Soviet Union was the world’s largest state and a power to be reckoned with. However, its collapse was inevitable due to a variety of reasons. As Gorbachev tried to revitalize both the economic and political spheres, it became apparent...

Why did President Reagan call for Soviet leader Gorbachev to “tear down” the Berlin Wall? a) He believed that Germany could remain divided without the wall. b) He believed that the wall was a threat to US national security. c) He believed that the wall’s removal would signal a new era of freedom. d) He believed that the wall’s removal would improve relations with the Soviet Union.

The correct answer is C as he (President Reagan) believed that the wall’s removal would signal a new era of freedom. Explanation: On November 6, 1987, President Reagan challenged Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to tear down the Berlin wall dividing Communist East Germany from the Federal Republic. Back in 1961,...

How did the weakening of the Soviet Union affect other nations in Europe?

When the Soviet Union became weak, countries that supported it faced a sudden decrease in support for Socialist and Communist parties. This resulted in the development of democratic values all over Europe. Explanation: The Soviet Union was a prominent power in Eurasia, and thus its weakening had a noticeable effect...

What did the Wagner Act of 1935 state? What was its significance?

The Wagner Act of 1935 is a legal act regulating labor relations in the United States. The Act was passed under the influence of a growing labor movement and was the pinnacle of US liberal labor law. Explanation: On July 5, 1935, the Wagner Act was approved by US President...

What were the causes and effects of the Homestead Steel strike?

Homestead Steel strike is a rebellion of workers at the Andrew Carnegie steel mill in Homestead, Pennsylvania between June and November 1892. The central cause of the attack was a lockout announced on June 30, 1892, in response to workers’ protests against a pay cut. Explanation: Homestead Steel strike was...

What was the main purpose of the Creel Committee? What did it achieve?

The Creel Committee aimed primarily at manipulating people’s minds to convince them to support the participation of the USA in World War I. It managed to make Americans promote and eagerly support activities connected with the War, for example, designing posters demonizing the German army. Explanation: The Creel Committee, or...

What did George Washington Thanksgiving proclamation state?

George Washington’s Thanksgiving proclamation stated that there should be a special day when all Americans would unite in the appreciation of safety and happiness across the United States, celebrating all the religious and civil liberties that are available to them. Explanation: For the first time, George Washington, the first President...

What is a tribute speech? How did it develop and what is its purpose?

The purpose of a tribute speech is to celebrate a specific person’s accomplishments while also taking into consideration their contribution to society or organization. Explanation: The word tribute comes from the Latin tributum, which means “contribution.” The initial meaning of this word implied that there was one party that showed...

Who is Pat Farrah and what is he known for?

Patrick “Pat” Farrah is an American former retail executive who is a co-founder of Home Depot, America’s famous retail giant. Explanation: Thanks to Pat Farrah’s merchandising skills, he became famous in the retail domain and was a significant figure in the growth of the USA’s niche firm. Born in Southern...

What are the most well-known Greek mythology symbols? What is their background?

Mythology is something that, at some point, influenced cultures and history in all countries. All the myths and legends affect not only customs and arts but morals and development of nations. As a matter of fact, studying the fundamental mythological beliefs, symbols, and their meaning is an efficient approach to...

What was Frederick Jackson Turner’s Frontier Thesis?

The American historian, Frederick Jackson Turner, formulated the Frontier Thesis in 1893. The key idea of this thesis is that the unsettled land played a critical role in the development of the American nation and democracy. Explanation: In “The Significance of the Frontier in American History”, Turner presented his interpretation...

Define praying towns.

Praying Towns were the settlements founded by the Puritans coming from New England, who attempted to convert native people to Christianity. The process of forming these towns lasted from 1646 to 1675. Explanation: The Puritans were ardent followers of Christianity; therefore, believed it was going to be easy to turn...

Provide Quartering Act definition.

Quartering Act presented a series of Acts of the British Parliament requiring the American government to supply British soldiers with accommodation, food, and drink. The date of the act’s issue was May 3rd, 1765. The Quartering Act was a part of the Munity Acts, which presupposed an annual update. Explanation:...

What was the cause for Fredonian Rebellion?

The Fredonian Rebellion (December 21, 1826-January 31st, 1827) was caused by a will of Anglo settlers of Texas to alienate from its Mexican part as new immigrants were moving into their land. Explanation: The Fredonian Rebellion was a brief uprising of Anglo settlers in the Mexican part of Texas to...

Who were patricians and plebeians? What roles did they play?

Patricians were the wealthy influential upper class Romans, whereas the rest of the people were considered to be plebeians, the lower class. Explanation: To be a patrician, a person had to be born in a certain family. Being the ruling class in the Roman Empire, patricians had all the power...

Define Spartan government. What was it known for?

Sparta was one of the essential city-states during the Archaic and Classical periods in Greece. It was known for its military power and well-organized society. Legend says that all of the existing Spartan laws were established by king Lycurgus. The spartan political system included elements of the monarchy(diarchy), oligarchy, and...

What exclusive powers did the Senate have?

The Senate of the USA has three general exclusive powers: passing sentences during impeachment trials and voting for or against the removal of an official, confirming presidential appointees, and approving treaties. Explanation: The Senate is the U. S. Congress’ upper chamber in the legislative branch, which is more powerful than...

How did the Missouri plan affect the governor’s powers?

On the one hand, the Missouri Court Plan limits the governor’s powers by letting him choose only between three candidates. On the other hand, it allows him to influence a commission to select a preferred candidate in favor of a local political party. Explanation: The Missouri Nonpartisan Court Plan, better...

What was Woodrow Wilson’s foreign policy?

Wilson’s foreign policy is, first of all, famous for his interference in the political affairs of Mexico and Latin America, as well as his plan of neutrality maintenance during World War I and Fourteen Points Address. Explanation: Woodrow Wilson’s foreign policy in Mexico started with him imposing democratic elections. He...

Define salutary neglect.

The salutary neglect was an unofficial policy of the British Crown towards American colonists. The initial idea was to make the regulations less strict. Explanation: The policy began to be in effect starting from 1607 and to 1763. The salutary neglect, in fact, contributed to the beginning of the increase...

What is the civic virtue definition?

In general, the concept of civic virtue refers to a person’s devotion to making contributions to society’s success and the set of habits and attitudes to be harvested and appreciated in citizens to strengthen communities. Explanation: Civic virtue belongs to the critical philosophic ideas linked with the understanding of things...

What was the cause of passing the Declaratory Act in 1766?

The Stamp Act, passed in 1765 by the British Parliament, caused the first mass outbreak of violence. The Act, which required the payment of taxes on all legal documents, newspapers and other printed materials, never came into force. Explanation: Revolts initiated by merchants and lawyers under the auspices of the...

What was the Chesapeake affair all about? What impact did it have?

The Chesapeake affair was a naval encounter in 1807 of America’s USS Chesapeake and Britain’s HMS Leopard, which resulted in the Chesapeake’s defeat. This encounter was one of the reasons to fuel the war in 1812. Explanation: The background of the Chesapeake affair included the conflict of the USA and...

What was the Free Soil Movement all about? What did it achieve?

Free Soil Movement is a political campaign of the 1840s to oppose the spread of slavery in the western territories of the United States. Although the movement did not exist for a long time, it managed to influence the overall attitude towards slavery expansion and determine the further line of...

What is the backstory of Bosque Redondo memorial?

Bosque Redondo memorial commemorates the victims of prosecutions and imprisonments by U.S. Military happening from 1863 to 1868. Explanation: When Americans and Mexicans colonized the land of New Mexico, they suffered from raids from Navajo tribes. The Indian tribes fought in order to reclaim their homeland and to collect resources...

What was Constitutional Union Party?

It was a conservative party that tried to prevent the separation of the southern states by ignoring the issue of slavery and promoting adherence to the union and the constitution. It ultimately failed to do so as Lincoln won the election of 1860 and the Civil War started soon after....

What is universal white male suffrage?

Universal manhood suffrage is a form of voting rights in which all adult males within a political system are allowed to vote, regardless of income, property, religion, race, or any other qualification. It is typically represented by a concept “one man, one vote”. Explanation: The adoption of Declaration of the Rights of Man and of...

Give the Free-Soil Party definition.

Free-Soil Party was a political party in the United States that existed for six years from 1848 to 1854 and opposed the extension of slavery to new territories. It then became a part of the Republican Party. Explanation: The political party officially formed during presidential elections in 1848, but the...

Provide details on the Dawes Plan.

The Dawes Plan was a plan released in 1924 to resolve the issue of World War I reparations that Germany had to cover. The program got its name from the American banker Charles Dawes. Explanation: When the World War I came to an end, Germany was made to pay reparations;...

What was the Three Estates system all about?

In the 18th century, the Three Estates system originated in France. In the 18th century, in France, the General states consisted of three estates: the first estate was the clergy, the second – the nobility, and the third one – all the rest of the population. Explanation: The majority of...

What was the ruling of Northern Securities case? What was the background?

Northern Securities Company was created to control the reserves of significant railway facilities. In 1903, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the monopoly was illegal, and ruled against stockholders of railway companies to dissolve Northern Securities. Explanation: U.S. federal relations were built according to the scheme of intense federal center...

What was Declaratory Act? What did it agree upon?

The Declaratory Act (1766) was a statement by the British Parliament accompanying the abolition of the Stamp Act. It stated that the tax authority of the British Parliament in America was the same as in Britain. Explanation: The Parliament directly taxed the colonies on income under the Sugar Act (1764)...

What was the Olive Branch Petition all about?

The Olive Branch Petition is a document adopted by the Second Continental Congress on July 5, 1775, and addressed to the British King George III. The petition was the last attempt to reconcile with Great Britain, in which the colonists pledged their allegiance to the crown. Explanation: The petition was...

What was the fighting words doctrine?

The First Amendment of the US Constitution protects people from profanity addressed to a specific person. Fighting words doctrine was about words expressly intended to cause a quarrel and is insignificant in terms of the communication content. Explanation: Speech is a powerful and suggestive communicative means of communication and information...

Who was the first black President in the world?

The first black presidents in the world were Alexandre Sabès Pétion and Henry Christophe. They both ran for President of the newly-independent State of Haiti, which fractured the nation. A more stable position of President would be President of Liberia, occupied by Joseph Jenkins Roberts and subsequently Stephen Allen Benson....

What was the structure of the articles of confederation?

The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was the first version of the United States Constitution. It had thirteen articles, a preamble, and a conclusion, and was penned in Pennsylvania in 1777. It stipulated the terms of cooperation between states and recognized no centralized American government nor federal taxation. Explanation:...

Who were the Sons of Liberty?

The Sons of Liberty were defined as a group of people who used provocations, threats, violence, and other forms of civil disorder in colonial America. The main goal of these instigators was to disturb the British government, intimidate loyalists, and encourage the confrontation between colonial leaders and the Crown. Explanation:...

Who was Charlemagne’s wife?

Hildegard of the Vinzgau was the wife of Charlemagne, a Frankish queen and the mother of the heir to the throne, Louis the Pious. She married Charlemagne in 771 after his first wife’s repudiation. Explanation: Hildegard was born in 754; she belonged to the Udalriching family and was the daughter...

Provide the details on the Boston Port Act.

The Boston Port Act of 1774 was adopted by the United Kingdom Parliament as a response to the colonists’ protest which was later named the Boston Tea Party. The Act closed the harbor in Boston (Massachusetts) for commerce and required the inhabitants of the city to pay the East India...