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What is a historical example of an engineering project that you believe was extremely risky but the benefits outweighed the risk? What is a historical example of a project that was undertaken were the risk ultimately did not outweigh the benefits?

One of the historical examples of an engineering project that was extremely risky, but the benefits outweighed the risk, was the development of nuclear technology. The risk of developing nuclear technology is extremely high in terms of associated costs, storage of radioactive wastes, and the danger of nuclear devices falling...

An engineer who has taken a new job with a competitor of the previous company meets a research engineer who describes her plans for developing a new product similar to one developed by the former company. He knows that the direction this engineer is taking will lead to a dead end and will cost the company a lot of time and money. Should he tell her what he knows? Does the answer to this question change if the new company is not a direct competitor of the previous one?

Synopsis of the issue Ethics is about what is right and what is wrong. Different ethical theories provide different approaches to dealing with ethical situations that arise. Issues The situation at giving rise to the problem is how to determine if the act is right or wrong of informing the...

An engineer leaves a company and goes to work for a competitor. a. Is it ethical for the engineer to try to lure customers away from the previous employer? b. Is it alright for the engineer to use proprietary knowledge gained while working for the previous employer at the new job? How would the answer to this question change if the new job weren’t for the competitor? c. At a new job, is it acceptable to use skills developed during your previous employment?

Synopsis It is not ethical for the engineer to try to lure customers from the previous employer. That is because; ethics are the rules of conduct that show us how society expects us to behave. If luring customers from the previous employer will cause harm to the previous employer, then...

Use line drawing to assess whether the scenarios of bribery/gift-giving under Examples in Section 4.6 from Engineering Ethics by Charles B. Fleddermann. What other examples can you think of to add to these scenarios?

The line drawing technique is used to draw a boundary between two properties. Line drawing is applied to give an analysis of concepts. In this case, a line drawing is used to assess the drawing line between bribery and gift so as to determine when an action is referred to...

Describe an ethical dilemma or conflict currently in the news. Be sure to give the most relevant facts, clarify the important concepts, discuss both sides of the issues and discuss what you believe to be the correct action to take.

The current world is characterized by innovation and invention, especially in the field of engineering. However, the issue of ethical dilemma emerges because of the conflict that exists between an engineer and his/her ethical obligations. Ethical dilemmas in Social Network-Based Research have emerged as a major ethical dilemma in the...

Risk is a part of engineering and technological progress, and assessing benefit versus risk is part of engineering responsibility. Along that line of thought, give me a historical example of an engineering project that you believe was extremely risky, but the benefits outweighed the risk. Second, give me a historical example of a project that was undertaken where the risk ultimately did not outweigh the benefits. For both parts of the question, make sure you fully discuss why you choose your example, including the associated risks and benefits.

The Manhattan Project was a complicated project and a very risky one indeed. I chose this project because of its many applications today and the risks that these applications pose. One of the risks of this project is that if nuclear energy is not handled cautiously, it might lead to...

You are an engineer who has taken a new job with a competitor of your previous company. At a meeting you attend, a research engineer describes her plans for developing a new product similar to one developed by your former company. You know that the direction this engineer is taking will lead to a dead-end and will cost the company a lot of time and money. Do you tell her what you know? Does the answer to this question change if the new company is not a direct competitor of the previous one?

Information obtained in a professional capacity should not be given away without the consent of the owner. This information belongs to the company where it was developed, and it will be unethical if it is undisclosed to parties that had no knowledge of it before. Companies dedicate resources and time...

An engineer leaves a company and goes to work for a competitor. a. Is it ethical for the engineer to try to lure customers away from the previous employer? b. Is it alright for the engineer to use proprietary knowledge gained while working for the previous employer at the new job? How would the answer to this question change if the new job weren’t for the competitor? c. At a new job, is it acceptable to use skills developed during your previous employment?

Improper use of proprietary information by engineers is a violation of engineering ethics. Using designs and/or any other information gained or even developed from a former workplace in a new workplace constitutes dishonesty, and if discovered, it is more likely to be a ground for litigation. It should be noted...

Do you have CFLs in your home? If so, I’d like to know why you chose to purchase something that is way more expensive than incandescent bulbs. If not, why not? What would encourage you to buy such a light bulb?

We use CFLs in our home for lighting because even though they are expensive, they are way more advantageous than conventional incandescent bulbs. Since we began using compact fluorescent lamps, we have experienced a significant drop in electricity bills. This directly conforms to the fact that these lamps use less...

Which best describes biogeographic isolation? A) It always leads to the formation of new species. B) It cannot lead to evolution. C) It is a mechanism for evolution. D) It occurs only through geographic forces.

D. It occurs only through geographic forces. Explanation: Biogeographic isolation is the separation of two populations of the same species due to physical factors. It may lead to evolution, as the groups will adapt to their new circumstances, which may be dramatically different between the two locales. However, geographic isolation...

An open area free of woods and buildings

The correct answer is “field”. Explanation: “Field” has numerous meanings, most of which deal with an area that is relatively open and spacious. When it comes to land, various sports and agriculture use the term as one of their basic concepts. Fields usually lack any large objects that would impede...