What were the major conclusions of the NSC-68 written in 1950?

The National Security Council Paper, NSC-68, was a 58-page top-secret report that the U.S. Department of State’s Policy Planning Staff completed writing on April 7, 1950. It concluded that President Harry Truman’s most plausible way and technique to deter the threatening Soviet Union was to support the extensive development and building of nuclear and conventional military arms. The approach would seek to secure the United States of America’s boundaries and protect its allies from the Soviet Union’s air and land attacks.

The United States accelerated exploitation of scientific airs and potentials would maintain communication lines and enhance the chances of political superiority. The conclusion demanded increased taxes and decreased government expenditures to increase military expenses and spending. Initially, some U.S. officials opposed the recommendations, but with time, NSC-68 became a policy, and the government of the United States of America initiated massive manufacturing and building of military nuclear arms.

Secondly, the NSC-68 concluded that the United States of America could no longer retreat or surrender toward isolationism without necessarily encouraging and promoting communism’s aggressive expansion worldwide. It recommended diplomatic negotiations with the Soviet Union or rapid building of military, economic, and political strengths in the Free States and countries worldwide. The approach would enable the United States of America to sustain sufficient strength to shut down and deter the Soviet Union’s aggression.

If an armed conflict arose in the communist bloc, the U.S. would successfully defend its boundaries, overseas territories, and interests. The Communist Bloc was a group of allies dominated by Soviet leaders who helped train communist revolutionaries worldwide. The eastern communist bloc comprised the Soviet Union, Hungary, East Germany, Bulgaria, Romania, and Poland, among others.

NSC-68 rejected the U.S. isolationism’s renewal in fear of Eurasia’s domination by the Soviet Union, leaving the U.S.A. stranded in the western region with fewer resources and allies. The conclusion ruled out a strike against the Soviet Union since it would alter the soviet’s offensive capacity hence inviting retaliatory and responsive strikes that would devastate most European states.

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