The television network CNBC and other television networks have been working to develop policies for their business correspondents and guests on their business shows because of conduct known as pump-and-dump, the practice of a Wall Street professional or network correspondent appearing on television to tout a particular stock as being a good buy. Often, unbeknown to the viewing audience, the guest or correspondent promoting the stock has a large holding in it and, after the television show runs and the stock price creeps up, sells his or her interest at a higher price than would have been possible before the show on which the person raved about the stock appeared. What category of ethical issues exists here? If you were a network executive, what would you do to remedy the problem? Should the government regulate such practices?

The ethical problem is that rising stock prices may seem unfair to buyers interested in them after the TV show. Seeing one piece of information on a TV show, customers can be frustrated when they check out and feel cheated. On the other hand, the increase in prices in this situation seems to be evident because there is a high demand for shares, and the popularity of the product has grown.

The other, more important aspect is that TV consultants voluntarily or knowingly lie or embellish information to achieve the desired earnings. Businesses and their leaders want to profit from the interest of buyers. It may also seem fair since being on a TV show is an exotic job for Wall Street workers. The employees completed a creative task that brought success personally to the business and them.

In my opinion, the issue of price increases in this context has a particular justice. But the price increase itself must be limited, and managers must strictly observe the restriction. The issue of lies is closely intertwined with the issue of embellishment and advertising. If I were the head of the network, I would not allow brazen lies and pass off black for white on a TV show. However, network executives may find themselves in different situations and need such TV shows if a network’s popularity or a particular TV show drops. I would not allow such experts to appear on my TV show in a usual case.

The government should not regulate this case and similar ones; however, the court must deal with the violators of severe violations of consumer rights. The ethical question is not equated to the legal one, however. It seems that pump-and-dump is, fortunately, or unfortunately, part of a very developed capitalist competition. Competition is beyond the bounds when a business does not rely on consumer feelings and frustrations but has only one goal: earnings.

The government should not ‘put a hat’ on television networks and TV shows and should not censor experts’ speeches. Perhaps I, as the head of a television network, should attend to the issue of warnings that information from an expert may be exaggerated. To do this, you can make inserts on the TV screen from the bottom or side of the image. The viewer will see this and independently decide whether to trust the expert or not.

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Academic.Tips. (2022) 'The television network CNBC and other television networks have been working to develop policies for their business correspondents and guests on their business shows because of conduct known as pump-and-dump, the practice of a Wall Street professional or network correspondent appearing on television to tout a particular stock as being a good buy. Often, unbeknown to the viewing audience, the guest or correspondent promoting the stock has a large holding in it and, after the television show runs and the stock price creeps up, sells his or her interest at a higher price than would have been possible before the show on which the person raved about the stock appeared. What category of ethical issues exists here? If you were a network executive, what would you do to remedy the problem? Should the government regulate such practices'. 15 November.

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Academic.Tips. (2022, November 15). The television network CNBC and other television networks have been working to develop policies for their business correspondents and guests on their business shows because of conduct known as pump-and-dump, the practice of a Wall Street professional or network correspondent appearing on television to tout a particular stock as being a good buy. Often, unbeknown to the viewing audience, the guest or correspondent promoting the stock has a large holding in it and, after the television show runs and the stock price creeps up, sells his or her interest at a higher price than would have been possible before the show on which the person raved about the stock appeared. What category of ethical issues exists here? If you were a network executive, what would you do to remedy the problem? Should the government regulate such practices? https://academic.tips/question/the-television-network-cnbc-and-other-television-networks-have-been-working-to-develop-policies-for-their-business-correspondents-and-guests-on-their-business-shows-because-of-conduct-known-as-pump-an/

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Academic.Tips. 2022. "The television network CNBC and other television networks have been working to develop policies for their business correspondents and guests on their business shows because of conduct known as pump-and-dump, the practice of a Wall Street professional or network correspondent appearing on television to tout a particular stock as being a good buy. Often, unbeknown to the viewing audience, the guest or correspondent promoting the stock has a large holding in it and, after the television show runs and the stock price creeps up, sells his or her interest at a higher price than would have been possible before the show on which the person raved about the stock appeared. What category of ethical issues exists here? If you were a network executive, what would you do to remedy the problem? Should the government regulate such practices?" November 15, 2022. https://academic.tips/question/the-television-network-cnbc-and-other-television-networks-have-been-working-to-develop-policies-for-their-business-correspondents-and-guests-on-their-business-shows-because-of-conduct-known-as-pump-an/.

1. Academic.Tips. "The television network CNBC and other television networks have been working to develop policies for their business correspondents and guests on their business shows because of conduct known as pump-and-dump, the practice of a Wall Street professional or network correspondent appearing on television to tout a particular stock as being a good buy. Often, unbeknown to the viewing audience, the guest or correspondent promoting the stock has a large holding in it and, after the television show runs and the stock price creeps up, sells his or her interest at a higher price than would have been possible before the show on which the person raved about the stock appeared. What category of ethical issues exists here? If you were a network executive, what would you do to remedy the problem? Should the government regulate such practices?" November 15, 2022. https://academic.tips/question/the-television-network-cnbc-and-other-television-networks-have-been-working-to-develop-policies-for-their-business-correspondents-and-guests-on-their-business-shows-because-of-conduct-known-as-pump-an/.


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Academic.Tips. "The television network CNBC and other television networks have been working to develop policies for their business correspondents and guests on their business shows because of conduct known as pump-and-dump, the practice of a Wall Street professional or network correspondent appearing on television to tout a particular stock as being a good buy. Often, unbeknown to the viewing audience, the guest or correspondent promoting the stock has a large holding in it and, after the television show runs and the stock price creeps up, sells his or her interest at a higher price than would have been possible before the show on which the person raved about the stock appeared. What category of ethical issues exists here? If you were a network executive, what would you do to remedy the problem? Should the government regulate such practices?" November 15, 2022. https://academic.tips/question/the-television-network-cnbc-and-other-television-networks-have-been-working-to-develop-policies-for-their-business-correspondents-and-guests-on-their-business-shows-because-of-conduct-known-as-pump-an/.

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"The television network CNBC and other television networks have been working to develop policies for their business correspondents and guests on their business shows because of conduct known as pump-and-dump, the practice of a Wall Street professional or network correspondent appearing on television to tout a particular stock as being a good buy. Often, unbeknown to the viewing audience, the guest or correspondent promoting the stock has a large holding in it and, after the television show runs and the stock price creeps up, sells his or her interest at a higher price than would have been possible before the show on which the person raved about the stock appeared. What category of ethical issues exists here? If you were a network executive, what would you do to remedy the problem? Should the government regulate such practices?" Academic.Tips, 15 Nov. 2022, academic.tips/question/the-television-network-cnbc-and-other-television-networks-have-been-working-to-develop-policies-for-their-business-correspondents-and-guests-on-their-business-shows-because-of-conduct-known-as-pump-an/.

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