Read Wa Thiong’o’s “Minutes of Glory” and watch Talk Africa: A Conversation with Ngugi Wa Thiong’o. Post a quote from Thiong’o’s talk that struck you – for any reason – and say a few words about why you posted it/why it struck you. You might make a connection between his talk and the story “Minutes of Glory” – or not.

Ngugi Wa Thiong’o is a renowned author whose literature has attracted global readers and enthusiasts, who praise him for his unique writing skills that expose ills in Africa, the colonial rule, and religion. In an interview hosted on Talk Africa by Beatrice Marshall, Ngugi described his literature journey and works. As he talked about his childhood and interest in literature, I was struck by his view on using African languages in a globalized world. When asked by the host whether he found it realistic to have African authors write in their local languages in today’s globalized world, he quickly commented that no language is inherently local or global. According to Ngugi, “African language is no more local than English or Chinese… English and French are where they are not because of the globality.” This point implied that there is no feature in a language that makes it global.

The above quote caught my attention particularly because it reflected the impact of colonialism on Africans’ culture. Ngugi Wa Thiong’o’s writing is mainly based on colonial and post-colonial Africa and the interactions between the African and European cultures. Although his works are primarily based on Kenyan history, they can be replicated in many parts of Africa. Ngugi notes that he was born during the British colonial rule in Kenya and witnessed the supremacy portrayed by the settlers. The above quote shows how his early childhood impacted his views on culture and globalization.

Colonial rule achieved one main goal in all its colonies: exerting white supremacy and suppressing indigenous values. As I listened to Ngugi discussing how every language is essential with no powers over another, I felt he was among the few who refused to be brainwashed and robbed of their uniqueness. It is not surprising that English and French can be called the global languages since they have dominated world literature from the colonial period till now. The question posed by Marshall also reveals that she felt the African languages were too “local.” The mere fact that some languages can be deemed unsuitable to be used in the globalized world of literature bespeaks continued colonialism even in the twenty-first century.

Linking Ngugi’s talk to my life, I have practiced discrimination against languages several times in my social interactions. We live in a world that views French, German, and English as the global languages without considering the fact that the purpose of language is to communicate to the target. I remember at some point in high school when Chinese student was constantly bullied for their inability to speak fluent English. Looking back, I realize that my mind was brainwashed and intoxicated with the supremacy of English. Ngugi’s talk has opened my mind to see the rich diversity of languages all around the globe and the need to preserve our cultural diversity. While at the convention in America, he was quick to defend African languages against the attack launched by Sloane at the conference. I learned that one should always defend their language and culture against those wishing to undermine it for the glory of a few languages.

Sourse: Talk Africa: A Conversation with Ngugi Wa Thiong’o.

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Academic.Tips. (2022) 'Read Wa Thiong’o’s “Minutes of Glory” and watch Talk Africa: A Conversation with Ngugi Wa Thiong’o. Post a quote from Thiong'o's talk that struck you – for any reason – and say a few words about why you posted it/why it struck you. You might make a connection between his talk and the story "Minutes of Glory" – or not'. 8 October.

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Academic.Tips. (2022, October 8). Read Wa Thiong’o’s “Minutes of Glory” and watch Talk Africa: A Conversation with Ngugi Wa Thiong’o. Post a quote from Thiong'o's talk that struck you – for any reason – and say a few words about why you posted it/why it struck you. You might make a connection between his talk and the story "Minutes of Glory" – or not. https://academic.tips/question/read-wa-thiongos-minutes-of-glory-and-watch-talk-africa-a-conversation-with-ngugi-wa-thiongo-post-a-quote-from-thiongos-talk-that-struck-you/

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Academic.Tips. 2022. "Read Wa Thiong’o’s “Minutes of Glory” and watch Talk Africa: A Conversation with Ngugi Wa Thiong’o. Post a quote from Thiong'o's talk that struck you – for any reason – and say a few words about why you posted it/why it struck you. You might make a connection between his talk and the story "Minutes of Glory" – or not." October 8, 2022. https://academic.tips/question/read-wa-thiongos-minutes-of-glory-and-watch-talk-africa-a-conversation-with-ngugi-wa-thiongo-post-a-quote-from-thiongos-talk-that-struck-you/.

1. Academic.Tips. "Read Wa Thiong’o’s “Minutes of Glory” and watch Talk Africa: A Conversation with Ngugi Wa Thiong’o. Post a quote from Thiong'o's talk that struck you – for any reason – and say a few words about why you posted it/why it struck you. You might make a connection between his talk and the story "Minutes of Glory" – or not." October 8, 2022. https://academic.tips/question/read-wa-thiongos-minutes-of-glory-and-watch-talk-africa-a-conversation-with-ngugi-wa-thiongo-post-a-quote-from-thiongos-talk-that-struck-you/.


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Academic.Tips. "Read Wa Thiong’o’s “Minutes of Glory” and watch Talk Africa: A Conversation with Ngugi Wa Thiong’o. Post a quote from Thiong'o's talk that struck you – for any reason – and say a few words about why you posted it/why it struck you. You might make a connection between his talk and the story "Minutes of Glory" – or not." October 8, 2022. https://academic.tips/question/read-wa-thiongos-minutes-of-glory-and-watch-talk-africa-a-conversation-with-ngugi-wa-thiongo-post-a-quote-from-thiongos-talk-that-struck-you/.

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"Read Wa Thiong’o’s “Minutes of Glory” and watch Talk Africa: A Conversation with Ngugi Wa Thiong’o. Post a quote from Thiong'o's talk that struck you – for any reason – and say a few words about why you posted it/why it struck you. You might make a connection between his talk and the story "Minutes of Glory" – or not." Academic.Tips, 8 Oct. 2022, academic.tips/question/read-wa-thiongos-minutes-of-glory-and-watch-talk-africa-a-conversation-with-ngugi-wa-thiongo-post-a-quote-from-thiongos-talk-that-struck-you/.

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