A top executive claimed that superior management is a craft technology because the work contains intangibles (such as handling personnel, interpreting the environment, and coping with unusual situations that have to be learned through experience). If this is true, is it appropriate to teach management in a business school? Does teaching management from a textbook assume that the manager’s job is analyzable and, therefore, that formal training rather than experience is most important?

Craft technology involves exercises that are not analyzable or that can be easily understood. It requires that individuals who engage in it go through a training cycle to understand its concepts. Although craft technology is not easily analyzable, it is essential to teach management in business schools. It provides students with a basic understanding of management roles and how to approach risks that arise in management. Also, teaching from a textbook neither assumes that a task is analyzable nor indicates that formal training is essential that experience. The textbook acts as a foundation for the building experience. Formal training gives confidence in making decisions and ensures the success of a business during unpredictable circumstances.

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Academic.Tips. (2022) 'A top executive claimed that superior management is a craft technology because the work contains intangibles (such as handling personnel, interpreting the environment, and coping with unusual situations that have to be learned through experience). If this is true, is it appropriate to teach management in a business school? Does teaching management from a textbook assume that the manager's job is analyzable and, therefore, that formal training rather than experience is most important'. 9 October.

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Academic.Tips. (2022, October 9). A top executive claimed that superior management is a craft technology because the work contains intangibles (such as handling personnel, interpreting the environment, and coping with unusual situations that have to be learned through experience). If this is true, is it appropriate to teach management in a business school? Does teaching management from a textbook assume that the manager's job is analyzable and, therefore, that formal training rather than experience is most important? https://academic.tips/question/a-top-executive-claimed-that-superior-management-is-a-craft-technology-because-the-work-contains-intangibles-such-as-handling-personnel-interpreting-the-environment-and-coping-with-unusual-situatio/

References

Academic.Tips. 2022. "A top executive claimed that superior management is a craft technology because the work contains intangibles (such as handling personnel, interpreting the environment, and coping with unusual situations that have to be learned through experience). If this is true, is it appropriate to teach management in a business school? Does teaching management from a textbook assume that the manager's job is analyzable and, therefore, that formal training rather than experience is most important?" October 9, 2022. https://academic.tips/question/a-top-executive-claimed-that-superior-management-is-a-craft-technology-because-the-work-contains-intangibles-such-as-handling-personnel-interpreting-the-environment-and-coping-with-unusual-situatio/.

1. Academic.Tips. "A top executive claimed that superior management is a craft technology because the work contains intangibles (such as handling personnel, interpreting the environment, and coping with unusual situations that have to be learned through experience). If this is true, is it appropriate to teach management in a business school? Does teaching management from a textbook assume that the manager's job is analyzable and, therefore, that formal training rather than experience is most important?" October 9, 2022. https://academic.tips/question/a-top-executive-claimed-that-superior-management-is-a-craft-technology-because-the-work-contains-intangibles-such-as-handling-personnel-interpreting-the-environment-and-coping-with-unusual-situatio/.


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Academic.Tips. "A top executive claimed that superior management is a craft technology because the work contains intangibles (such as handling personnel, interpreting the environment, and coping with unusual situations that have to be learned through experience). If this is true, is it appropriate to teach management in a business school? Does teaching management from a textbook assume that the manager's job is analyzable and, therefore, that formal training rather than experience is most important?" October 9, 2022. https://academic.tips/question/a-top-executive-claimed-that-superior-management-is-a-craft-technology-because-the-work-contains-intangibles-such-as-handling-personnel-interpreting-the-environment-and-coping-with-unusual-situatio/.

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"A top executive claimed that superior management is a craft technology because the work contains intangibles (such as handling personnel, interpreting the environment, and coping with unusual situations that have to be learned through experience). If this is true, is it appropriate to teach management in a business school? Does teaching management from a textbook assume that the manager's job is analyzable and, therefore, that formal training rather than experience is most important?" Academic.Tips, 9 Oct. 2022, academic.tips/question/a-top-executive-claimed-that-superior-management-is-a-craft-technology-because-the-work-contains-intangibles-such-as-handling-personnel-interpreting-the-environment-and-coping-with-unusual-situatio/.

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